Attention, the WhatsApp virus hoax is back!

Since the beginning of this year, numerous publications concerning a "malicious video" have circulated on social networks. These are warning messages regarding a video titled “Argentina” which appeared on WhatsApp and which contains a virus capable of hacking a phone in just 10 seconds.

According to the publications, the origin of the warning is the NITB of Pakistan (National Information Technology Board). It would appear, however, that the information is misleading since it is simply a hoax.

Attention, the WhatsApp virus hoax is back!
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We know that on January 11, the NITB tweeted the original warning about the virus that appeared on WhatsApp, but the post was subsequently deleted.

The posts appeared on most social media

Many accounts shared the warning message on social media such as Facebook and Twitter. The TechRupt Facebook page, which has more than 100,000 subscribers, for example shared the information on January 11, 2021. The message in question reads:

“NITB Cyber Alerts. A malicious video named Argentina is circulating on WhatsApp and shows how the Covid-19 curve is flattening in Argentina. Do not open the link because it will hack your phone in 10 seconds and it cannot be stopped under any circumstances ”.

The message is accompanied by a poster published by Pakistan's NITB with the headline “Cyber Security Alert”. A screenshot of the NITB tweet taken before it was deleted shows that the warning did indeed come from the organization. In addition, a Pakistani blog also published an article containing the original NITB post, which is now inaccessible.

Read also: 4 alternatives to replace WhatsApp

An international phenomenon

With social media becoming a part of the daily life of many people, news travels very quickly. We know that the false warning message had already spread to several countries around the world, including the United States, the Philippines, Nigeria and Argentina.

In the case of Nigeria, the NITDA or National Information Technology Development Agency had declared on July 18, 2020 that it was a message which "aimed to sow panic". Agency officials also made it clear that they were able to confirm that this message was just intoxicating.

Read also: WhatsApp backs off and postpones the implementation of its new terms of use

Thus, we now know that this message concerning WhatsApp is a fake. But in any case, it doesn't cost a thing to be careful when receiving links or files of unknown origin.

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Since the beginning of this year, numerous publications concerning a "malicious video" have circulated on social networks. These are warning messages regarding a video titled “Argentina” which appeared on WhatsApp and which contains a virus capable of hacking a phone in just 10 seconds.

According to the publications, the origin of the warning is the NITB of Pakistan (National Information Technology Board). It would appear, however, that the information is misleading since it is simply a hoax.

Attention, the WhatsApp virus hoax is back!
Pixabay credits

We know that on January 11, the NITB tweeted the original warning about the virus that appeared on WhatsApp, but the post was subsequently deleted.

The posts appeared on most social media

Many accounts shared the warning message on social media such as Facebook and Twitter. The TechRupt Facebook page, which has more than 100,000 subscribers, for example shared the information on January 11, 2021. The message in question reads:

“NITB Cyber Alerts. A malicious video named Argentina is circulating on WhatsApp and shows how the Covid-19 curve is flattening in Argentina. Do not open the link because it will hack your phone in 10 seconds and it cannot be stopped under any circumstances ”.

The message is accompanied by a poster published by Pakistan's NITB with the headline “Cyber Security Alert”. A screenshot of the NITB tweet taken before it was deleted shows that the warning did indeed come from the organization. In addition, a Pakistani blog also published an article containing the original NITB post, which is now inaccessible.

Read also: 4 alternatives to replace WhatsApp

An international phenomenon

With social media becoming a part of the daily life of many people, news travels very quickly. We know that the false warning message had already spread to several countries around the world, including the United States, the Philippines, Nigeria and Argentina.

In the case of Nigeria, the NITDA or National Information Technology Development Agency had declared on July 18, 2020 that it was a message which "aimed to sow panic". Agency officials also made it clear that they were able to confirm that this message was just intoxicating.

Read also: WhatsApp backs off and postpones the implementation of its new terms of use

Thus, we now know that this message concerning WhatsApp is a fake. But in any case, it doesn't cost a thing to be careful when receiving links or files of unknown origin.

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