Covid-19: a new vaccine … for ferrets

Who Said the Coronavirus COVID-19 Kills Only in Humans? It turns out that some animals are also vulnerable to the terrible disease … this is particularly the case of farmed mink which died by tens of thousands in the United States after contracting the virus.

Some people worry about a close cousin of the farmed mink, the black-footed ferret, which is one of the most endangered mammals in North America. What if COVID-19 also infected and killed thousands of these endangered little hairballs?

Covid-19: a new vaccine … for ferrets
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This is how researchers decided to develop a vaccine specially developed for black-legged ferrets: around a hundred of them have been vaccinated.

Save an endangered species …

According to information reported by QZ.com, 120 black-footed ferrets at the National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center in Colorado have received an experimental vaccine developed by the National Wildlife Health Center. Officials have taken this initiative to protect this now rare species which is particularly vulnerable to disease.

In 1979 for example, the adorable beasts were struck down by an animal variant of the Black Death. For years, environmentalists had thought that the species had completely disappeared, until we discovered a small colony still alive in the United States …

So prevention is better than cure! As Tonie Rocke of the National Wildlife Health Center explains: “We don't have direct evidence that blacklegged ferrets are susceptible to Covid-19, but given their close relationship with minkeys, we wouldn't want to know. . "

To read also: Covid-19: the variant B.1.1.7 would have been spotted in about thirty countries

… but also to prevent a new pandemic

If the fate of black-legged ferrets is of great concern to nature lovers, this experimental vaccination also aims to preserve humans. Researchers fear a mutation of the virus and that the latter will then be transmitted to humans …

This could indeed lead to another global pandemic that current treatments and vaccines could not contain given the new nature of the virus.

But why mink and ferrets? Well last November, more than 200 cases of COVID-19 in humans with variants associated with farmed mink were reported by Danish health officials. The researchers found that more than a dozen of the cases were caused by a mutant virus that could compromise the effectiveness of future vaccines.

Read also: Covid-19: a cocktail of antibodies to boost immunity?

Whether the National Wildlife Health Center's experimental vaccine will be truly effective remains to be seen.

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Who Said the Coronavirus COVID-19 Kills Only in Humans? It turns out that some animals are also vulnerable to the terrible disease … this is particularly the case of farmed mink which died by tens of thousands in the United States after contracting the virus.

Some people worry about a close cousin of the farmed mink, the black-footed ferret, which is one of the most endangered mammals in North America. What if COVID-19 also infected and killed thousands of these endangered little hairballs?

Covid-19: a new vaccine … for ferrets
pixabay credits

This is how researchers decided to develop a vaccine specially developed for black-legged ferrets: around a hundred of them have been vaccinated.

Save an endangered species …

According to information reported by QZ.com, 120 black-footed ferrets at the National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center in Colorado have received an experimental vaccine developed by the National Wildlife Health Center. Officials have taken this initiative to protect this now rare species which is particularly vulnerable to disease.

In 1979 for example, the adorable beasts were struck down by an animal variant of the Black Death. For years, environmentalists had thought that the species had completely disappeared, until we discovered a small colony still alive in the United States …

So prevention is better than cure! As Tonie Rocke of the National Wildlife Health Center explains: “We don't have direct evidence that blacklegged ferrets are susceptible to Covid-19, but given their close relationship with minkeys, we wouldn't want to know. . "

To read also: Covid-19: the variant B.1.1.7 would have been spotted in about thirty countries

… but also to prevent a new pandemic

If the fate of black-legged ferrets is of great concern to nature lovers, this experimental vaccination also aims to preserve humans. Researchers fear a mutation of the virus and that the latter will then be transmitted to humans …

This could indeed lead to another global pandemic that current treatments and vaccines could not contain given the new nature of the virus.

But why mink and ferrets? Well last November, more than 200 cases of COVID-19 in humans with variants associated with farmed mink were reported by Danish health officials. The researchers found that more than a dozen of the cases were caused by a mutant virus that could compromise the effectiveness of future vaccines.

Read also: Covid-19: a cocktail of antibodies to boost immunity?

Whether the National Wildlife Health Center's experimental vaccine will be truly effective remains to be seen.

1 Shares
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