How to transform a Facebook photo into ASCII version?

Facebook has a pretty funny hidden feature. It effectively allows Internet users to transform any public photo into an ASCII version. And be careful because you can even opt for a color version or a black and white version. Because hey, all tastes are in nature. How to do ? It's simple, just follow this little guide.

The first thing to know about this famous function, that it only works with public photos. It's a bit limiting but you have to deal with it.

How To Transform A Facebook Photo Into Ascii Version

With Facebook, it is very easy to generate ASCII versions of your photos, or those of your friends.

The good side of the thing is that most Internet users do not pay attention to the rights associated with their publications and most of the content shared on the platform is thus made public.

Please note, this function only works with public photos!

So what next? Start by finding a drinkable photo and click on it to display it in full screen. When it's done, just right-click on the image and go for the option “Open image in new tab” . It usually appears at the top of the list in the context menu.

Be careful, however, because the title of the command may vary depending on the browser used.

There, normally, the selected image should open in your browser.

If you take a look at the address bar, then you'll end up with something like this: “my-filename-super-long.jpg” . Just click in the field and add the extension “.txt” or “.html” at the end of the address before pressing the “Enter” key.

The magic will then operate. The first extension will force Facebook to generate a black and white ASCII version, against a color version for the second.

From there, nothing prevents you from taking a screenshot to create a new profile picture that will impress your friends, of course, but also your colleagues and your boss.

For the record, you should know that this trick was discovered by a developer named Mathias Bynens. And of course, no one knows what prompted the social media giant to set up a feature like this.

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Facebook has a pretty funny hidden feature. It effectively allows Internet users to transform any public photo into an ASCII version. And be careful because you can even opt for a color version or a black and white version. Because hey, all tastes are in nature. How to do ? It's simple, just follow this little guide.

The first thing to know about this famous function, that it only works with public photos. It's a bit limiting but you have to deal with it.

How To Transform A Facebook Photo Into Ascii Version

With Facebook, it is very easy to generate ASCII versions of your photos, or those of your friends.

The good side of the thing is that most Internet users do not pay attention to the rights associated with their publications and most of the content shared on the platform is thus made public.

Please note, this function only works with public photos!

So what next? Start by finding a drinkable photo and click on it to display it in full screen. When it's done, just right-click on the image and go for the option “Open image in new tab” . It usually appears at the top of the list in the context menu.

Be careful, however, because the title of the command may vary depending on the browser used.

There, normally, the selected image should open in your browser.

If you take a look at the address bar, then you'll end up with something like this: “my-filename-super-long.jpg” . Just click in the field and add the extension “.txt” or “.html” at the end of the address before pressing the “Enter” key.

The magic will then operate. The first extension will force Facebook to generate a black and white ASCII version, against a color version for the second.

From there, nothing prevents you from taking a screenshot to create a new profile picture that will impress your friends, of course, but also your colleagues and your boss.

For the record, you should know that this trick was discovered by a developer named Mathias Bynens. And of course, no one knows what prompted the social media giant to set up a feature like this.

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