The orbits of Jupiter's moons in video

The gas giant Jupiter, apart from being the largest planet in our solar system, is also known to have a very large number of satellites. Indeed, Jupiter has 79 known satellites revolving around it, a number far from the only moon that the Earth has.

A Youtuber by the name of Djxatlanta posted on his channel a video showing the orbit of 63 of these 79 known satellites of Jupiter , and we can say that it arouses curiosity about the different trajectories of space objects. You might think when watching the video that the risk of collisions is very high, but this is not at all the case given the size of the planet which still has an average radius of 69,911 km.

The orbits of Jupiter's moons in video
Pixabay credits

In the video, the “camera” moves away from the planet and outwards. It is a view which highlights the high number of satellites, and which makes it possible to see which are the closest and which are the most distant.

Those who are close to the surface

When looking at the video, we can observe that the satellites are divided into two distinct groups. The first group includes those who orbit quite close to the planet, and who are also the best known. These satellites are fast and generally move in the same plane. We can cite for example the “Galilean Moons” Europe, Io, Ganymede and Callisto.

We can also observe that there are satellites which are even closer to the surface and which move even faster. These circle the planet for a time interval of between 7 hours and 17 days. As for their distance from the planet, it varies from 100,000 km to about 2 million km. Among these closely spaced satellites are Amalthea, Thebe, Adrastea and Metis.

Those who are more distant

You can see from the video that there is a certain fairly large area around Jupiter where you cannot find any satellites when you move outward. But after this area, a multitude of space objects make their entry and form the second group. We can cite for example Elara, Lysithea, Himalia, Leda, or even Sinope, but the list is still long.

Anyway, if you want to see for yourself how Jupiter's moons move, feel free to watch the Djxatlanta video below.

1 Shares
More from admin

Raisezt Reviews in 2021

Raisezt is an online shop that claims to sell room clock sticks,...
Read More

The gas giant Jupiter, apart from being the largest planet in our solar system, is also known to have a very large number of satellites. Indeed, Jupiter has 79 known satellites revolving around it, a number far from the only moon that the Earth has.

A Youtuber by the name of Djxatlanta posted on his channel a video showing the orbit of 63 of these 79 known satellites of Jupiter , and we can say that it arouses curiosity about the different trajectories of space objects. You might think when watching the video that the risk of collisions is very high, but this is not at all the case given the size of the planet which still has an average radius of 69,911 km.

The orbits of Jupiter's moons in video
Pixabay credits

In the video, the “camera” moves away from the planet and outwards. It is a view which highlights the high number of satellites, and which makes it possible to see which are the closest and which are the most distant.

Those who are close to the surface

When looking at the video, we can observe that the satellites are divided into two distinct groups. The first group includes those who orbit quite close to the planet, and who are also the best known. These satellites are fast and generally move in the same plane. We can cite for example the “Galilean Moons” Europe, Io, Ganymede and Callisto.

We can also observe that there are satellites which are even closer to the surface and which move even faster. These circle the planet for a time interval of between 7 hours and 17 days. As for their distance from the planet, it varies from 100,000 km to about 2 million km. Among these closely spaced satellites are Amalthea, Thebe, Adrastea and Metis.

Those who are more distant

You can see from the video that there is a certain fairly large area around Jupiter where you cannot find any satellites when you move outward. But after this area, a multitude of space objects make their entry and form the second group. We can cite for example Elara, Lysithea, Himalia, Leda, or even Sinope, but the list is still long.

Anyway, if you want to see for yourself how Jupiter's moons move, feel free to watch the Djxatlanta video below.

1 Shares
" />