Your car also records your data without your knowledge

When we talk about data privacy and hacking, we tend to think only of our social media accounts, our phone, our browsing history or even the cookies that follow us all over the Internet. But there is one thing much closer to us and one that we often use that the Verge says is just as well aware of our actions: our car.

NBC News recently produced a report showing how much data our cars collect about us and how that data can help police solve investigations as well as facilitate the evil designs of criminals.

Your car also records your data without your knowledge
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This data collection feature is highly dependent on your vehicle model and its different features, but generally speaking, a car can deliver your location data, voice recordings and even tell when its doors have been opened.

Criminal arrested "thanks" to recording of his voice

To support its report, NBC News cites the case of Joshua Wessel, a man who was charged with murder because the victim's truck had recorded his voice at the time of the crime. Apparently the police were able to access this data through software from a company called Berla Corp.

This software is not only capable of reading unique identifiers of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi devices connected to a car's infotainment system, but also call logs, contacts as well as text messages. In addition to this infotainment-related information, Berla's software can also consult the logs kept by the car's internal computer, revealing its location log from its integrated GPS and indicating the times when the car is opened and closed. its doors.

Australian man bullied his ex-girlfriend by controlling his car remotely

But if car data can do good, when it has fallen into the wrong hands, it is dangerous. This was the case with an Australian, also quoted by NBC News, who used an app to directly access data from his ex's Land Rover. In addition to having direct access to this information, he was also able to control the car, by starting or turning it off remotely and by opening the windows.

The author of the article for The Verge, Mitchell Clark, claims to have seen this phenomenon of data collection by a car for himself. Having bought a used car, he found that the information of the previous owner was still stored there. Ultimately, the root of the problem is that we are now sharing our data with more and more devices. However, for the moment, nothing guarantees us complete protection of our data. Finally, is the fight for data confidentiality a utopia?

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When we talk about data privacy and hacking, we tend to think only of our social media accounts, our phone, our browsing history or even the cookies that follow us all over the Internet. But there is one thing much closer to us and one that we often use that the Verge says is just as well aware of our actions: our car.

NBC News recently produced a report showing how much data our cars collect about us and how that data can help police solve investigations as well as facilitate the evil designs of criminals.

Your car also records your data without your knowledge
Pixabay credits

This data collection feature is highly dependent on your vehicle model and its different features, but generally speaking, a car can deliver your location data, voice recordings and even tell when its doors have been opened.

Criminal arrested "thanks" to recording of his voice

To support its report, NBC News cites the case of Joshua Wessel, a man who was charged with murder because the victim's truck had recorded his voice at the time of the crime. Apparently the police were able to access this data through software from a company called Berla Corp.

This software is not only capable of reading unique identifiers of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi devices connected to a car's infotainment system, but also call logs, contacts as well as text messages. In addition to this infotainment-related information, Berla's software can also consult the logs kept by the car's internal computer, revealing its location log from its integrated GPS and indicating the times when the car is opened and closed. its doors.

Australian man bullied his ex-girlfriend by controlling his car remotely

But if car data can do good, when it has fallen into the wrong hands, it is dangerous. This was the case with an Australian, also quoted by NBC News, who used an app to directly access data from his ex's Land Rover. In addition to having direct access to this information, he was also able to control the car, by starting or turning it off remotely and by opening the windows.

The author of the article for The Verge, Mitchell Clark, claims to have seen this phenomenon of data collection by a car for himself. Having bought a used car, he found that the information of the previous owner was still stored there. Ultimately, the root of the problem is that we are now sharing our data with more and more devices. However, for the moment, nothing guarantees us complete protection of our data. Finally, is the fight for data confidentiality a utopia?

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